Michael Hagele Gives Advice To Beginning Mountain Bike Riders

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Mountain bike riding both as a sport and avocation is rising rapidly in popularity in the United States. Enthusiast Michael Hagele explains that beginners need not be intimidated when introduced to mountain biking and can if possessing a positive attitude and the right equipment, master the basics in just a few outings. Hagele goes on to explain that once the basics are mastered riders can go on to progress to higher levels of mountain bike riding at their own pace.

Michael Hagele advises that metro areas in the country now like Atlanta and Chicago have parks dedicated to mountain biking that come with groomed paths for training that are graded by degree of difficulty. These tracks are the perfect training platforms for novice mountain bike riders that are just familiarizing themselves with the process of changing gears and navigating obstacles. Beginning riders will also benefit from sharing the track with more experienced mountain bike riders from whom they can watch and learn. Learn more at angel.com about Michael.

Hagele says that it is important for new mountain bike riders to use quality equipment regardless of whether it is purchased, rented, or borrowed. Mountain bikes typically have much sturdier frames than do bikes designed for road usage and are also outfitted with wider tires that are kept at lowered air pressures. It is also noted that mountain bikes possess twice the number gears as road bikes.

Michael Hagele also stresses the importance of carefully selecting equipment and attire to be used wild mountain bike riding. First of all, a well-fitting is a must to enjoy the sport. Next, Hagele suggests a pair of athletic shoes that are flat and ‘clipless.’ The next order of business says Hagele is to don comfortable clothes that are lightweight and ‘breathe.’

It is also important to prepare a large bottle of water or some other hydrating fluid that can be kept in the designated bracket that is located in the center of the bike’s frame.

Optional equipment noted by Michael Hagele includes super grip gloves, fanny or backpacks, and for longer rides in backcountry areas, riders might opt to pack a map of the trail, spare tire tubes, patches, and an energy bar or two. Visit: https://medium.com/@hagele18